How I'd grow Bride Brite

June 3, 2020

Bride Brite is a teeth-whitening kit that you can use at home.

It’s a dual-light tech, wireless, rechargeable, auto-sanitizing mouthpiece with 3 sensitivity-free whitening pens.

They guarantee a bright smile at a fraction of the dentist’s cost with just 10 minutes per 10 days.

But have you guessed that from the landing page? I didn’t, and had to browse throughout the website to understand what this “program” is.

What is the product? How does it work? Why is it better? These are all questions that should be immediately addressed above the fold.

The hero image plays a big role during the first site visit. It immediately says what your product is all about.

The best hero images show both the product and the benefit.

Bride Brite should use that opportunity to show a pic of a smiling bride with the mouthpiece in her hand.

I like the copy of their product page because it addresses possible objections.

However, their conversion rate would benefit from incorporating some key elements they already offer into their copy:

- Free shipping and times
- 30-day money-back guarantee
- Social proof with reviews

I'm not 100% sure about their positioning. I often advise going niche for differentiation when you sell a commodity.

But when a product is unique, I'd go after a bigger market. Men could be very interested in a product like this, but the bride branding adds too much friction.

First, I’d form partnerships with people who already own my potential customers: wedding planners.

I’d set up an affiliate program with custom coupons that give a generous cut. They’ll be very incentivized to suggest Bride Brite to their clients - it’s a win-win.

I’d also consider joining forces with other brands in the same niche to do cross-promotions with exclusive offers.

Sharing audiences with non-competing products is one of the most undervalued tactics of digital marketing that can give great results.

For sales, I think their number one channel will be social media. Pinterest for sure, but first and foremost - Instagram.

But they need to come up with a stronger photo game to make sure their photos reach the Explore tab because that’s the key to organic growth.

Since the founders are bootstrapping, it’d be hard to hire a photographer to create enough great content to post frequently.

User generated content could help: they could just ask their customers - brides - to send a pic of them smiling during the wedding day.

Pro tip: great photos that make it to the Explore tab is step #1. After, you need to convert casual browsers into followers.

A strong bio is key. It’s the first thing they read. If they don’t understand what you do immediately, you have 0% chance of getting followed.

They also need paid advertising. Be careful about rules: you can’t show before & after pics, bold claims, etc. on FB ads.

I’m not convinced by their copy. 99% of their target audience have no idea what Product Hunt is. I’d rewrite it using the problem-agitate-solve formula.

SEO could also be one of their biggest sources of traffic in the long term.

But there are a few things they need to fix, starting from their on-page optimization.

Right now, they are throwing keywords everywhere without a clear strategy.

A common misconception: if you want to rank for a keyword, you need to repeat it on multiple site pages.

In reality, this confuses Google. Bride Brite should study what the exact search intent behind each keyword is, and create a single page optimized for that term.

Since ranking for commercial keywords will be hard, they should start by creating informational articles on their blog.

Their current articles are too short and lack depth. When you’re starting out and don’t have links, you need to compensate with amazing content.

With Google’s recent focus on speed, they also need to pay close attention to their website performance, especially on mobile.

I recommend periodically checking it with the PageSpeed insights tool, and taking notes to correct errors and implement suggestions.

Learn marketing from case studies

Every two weeks I pick a website and write a short case study explaining exactly how I’d grow it